ichigorennyu

ichigorennyu:

Found out from a friend and checked it out.  This was on their website

Effective September 1st, 2014, Toronto Indie Arts Market has ceased operation.

All events previously scheduled for Fall 2014 have been cancelled.

I’m sad. :<

Oh …! Sad to hear. :( FYI for those who had been planning on attending one of the upcoming events.


howtobeaconartist

astrobank asked:

Hi! I'm gonna be doing my first artist alley in october and I was wondering how many copies of each print you would suggest making? Its a 3-day con and the prints I'm drawing are from animes that are pretty popular so I wasn't sure how much is a good amount

howtobeaconartist answered:

Kiriska: Personally, I wouldn’t make more than 5 of each thing, maybe 10 if you’re really confident in the piece. When in doubt, always lowball. It’s better to sell out and have to print more than to be stuck with 50 prints no one wants because you overestimated things. Once you’ve been to a few shows, you’ll have a better idea of what works for you and will be able to adjust initial print run numbers accordingly.

HeidiBlack: This is also going to depend on how many different print options you have.  if you have 10, 15, different images, then I would say 5 ish of each.  If you’ve got 20, 30 different images, maybe 3 or 4.  if you have just a few different images, then maybe 10.  So really, I guess I would limit the overall number to less than 100 prints total?  Its always easier to have too few I feel like, and just go home or even make reprints if you really want than to have leftover stock.  But it also depends on the price you’re getting them at and how far you have to travel.  Sorry if this isn’t helping at all.

Nattosoup: I’m the odd one out of the three in that I really don’t do prints, haha.  I think that if you’re going to sell prints, you should probably have a variety, so that when people come to you, that’s what they’re coming to buy.  I agree with Heidi and Kiri that lowballing for a first con is probably a wise idea, and I’d definitely keep track of not only what sells for you, but what seems to sell for others.  Take note what demographic is doing the actual buying, not just the wanting, and what the demographic with the money wants.  Your first convention selling (heck, your first YEAR as an artist in the artist alley) is going to be a learning process, so don’t feel too discouraged if sales are low.

I also recommend that you have a few smaller items that you can mass produce and sell at a lower pricepoint to attract customers who might not buy prints (I’m one of those people, so I know they exist), or for people to cheap/broke to buy prints.

Goodluck at your first con!  I hope you do well, and I hope you learn a lot.

Aaand more experienced artist alley perspectives on the “how many prints” question!

A reminder that the more images/products you have, the more real estate you’ll also need to make sure they’re visible. Prints on display are likely sell more than prints in a binder, if only because people can see them easily.

We collected some thoughts on this topic in a previous ask too: http://aatoast.tumblr.com/post/87244238379/how-do-you-know-how-many-of-each-piece-to-get-printed

And you can find more on this topic here in our prints tag: http://aatoast.tumblr.com/tagged/prints


techycutie

techycutie:

Finally did a mock up thing with my PVC display! 

I will be using clamps as well as making it 2ft taller in the near future. (as soon as I finish 4 more prints and need the space)

I wanted to make a more visually appealing setup and improve my professionalism as compared to my previous tables. I don’t have any of my new prints in yet so im a bit paranoid about filling all the space since it is a HUGE rig compared to what I had previously! I have completely taken away the monitor since it is obnoxious to transport and I have stopped showing my animation work and speedpaints on it. I will be using a tablet on a stand instead to showcase speedpaints on because it is not as big and not so attention-grabbing. Now I have to make a display for my button badges.. 


fictograph

Anonymous asked:

Hello! I'm sorry if you've gotten this question before. I'm new to art alleys, do you have a suggestion for how many prints one should take? Like a general number? Thanks so much!

fictograph answered:

Print quantities are honestly different for everyone.  More popular artists will need more, and smaller merchandise usually requires higher quantities, too. 

Personally, I only sell 11”x17” prints, so I calculate based on event attendance.  I run about 10-20 of my best-sellers (like Sherlock, Game of Thrones) and then 3-5 of my less popular stuff (like original work).  Lower end being for cons about 1,000-5,000 (like ALA, San Japan) and higher end being for cons of 10,000+ (like Otakon).

Certain cons will surprise you though!  My style does awful in Southern California, so I print on the lower end for AX.  But some venues are just easier because the artist-customer ratio is higher, so I print on the high end for NanDesuKan.

Another experienced convention artist weighs in on the popular “how many prints” question and outlines an approach that may be helpful to consider!

For those interested, we also have some thoughts here from a previous ask:

http://aatoast.tumblr.com/post/87244238379/how-do-you-know-how-many-of-each-piece-to-get-printed


Thanks so much for following us vitalemontea! ^^ We’re not tax experts so of course we must start with a disclaimer that you should talk to a tax expert and/or contact CRA directly.

One thing I will note is that a lot of marketplace websites aren’t based in Canada, so their terminology and tax standards/process as you know may not align with ours. I would think earnings from sites like Redbubble would be taxable income. On the CRA website, I found this:

Starting with the 2013 tax year, if you earn income from one or more webpages or websites, you must follow the reporting requirements that apply to you. See Reporting Internet business activities.

http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/tx/bsnss/tpcs/cmm/menu-eng.html
http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/tx/bsnss/tpcs/cmm/ncm/wbncm-eng.html

Webpages and websites to report
Indicate your income generating webpages or websites. If you have more than five webpages or websites, specify the five top income generators. Examples of webpages or websites that you should include are:

    webpages and websites that allow the completing and submitting of an order form, the checking out a shopping cart or similar transactions;
   online market place websites where your goods and/or services are sold; and
    webpages and websites hosted outside of Canada that generate income.

And here are some numbers for contacting the CRA directly to clarify.
http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/cntct/phn-eng.html

A few more links that might be helpful:

Hope this helps point you in the right direction!


peiweili asked:

What are the best cons for promoting and selling Original work, I have a comic and I want to sell it as well as prints and other merchandise based off it. Which cons would be best for me? Please don't suggest fanexpo, because it's too expensive and focused on fan art, I won't return till I get a bigger fan base. I'd like to build a dedicated fanbase, not just make quick sales (thought that would be nice of course).

Hey peiweili!

I’m assuming you’re asking for suggestions in the GTA, which is what we’re most familiar with. Unfortunately, while we can give you suggestions, we can’t guarantee in any way that they are the “best” cons for everyone or anyone. As you know, there are lots of variables/factors at play and it’s too unpredictable. We haven’t been to every event, and even for the ones we have done, our personal experience and the things we make may not effectively parallel yours.

That said, for comic artists, TCAF (Toronto Comic Arts Festival) is a big one at the top of most people’s lists and sounds like it’s the best fit for you - original comics extending into other merchandise. They are open for applications right now (deadline Oct 17, 2014)! Do note that it is a fully juried application with hundreds of artists around the world applying every year, so it’s not the easiest to get into.
Aside from that, I would suggest trying more indie, comics and self-publishing/small press events where people are more looking for original creative works, such as Canzine and the new Animation Arts Maarket (part of TAAFI, the Toronto Animation Arts Festival International). They’re definitely much smaller than anime cons, but may have more of the target audience you’re trying to engage with.
We’re very fortunate as Toronto is a busy city with lots of events to try. Check out our list and visit the various sites to get a sense of the event scope and target audience: http://aatoast.tumblr.com/events

If it’s feasible, consider other events similar to TCAF outside of the GTA. Montreal and New York both have comic festivals that might be good for you.

Some cons, like Anime North, are also dedicating areas to professional artists (e.g., AN’s Pro Plaza is targeted to artists in your situation), though audience awareness and appetite at such events may not be as large yet as the awareness/appetite for fanworks. I agree with you that building a dedicated fanbase will help increase the visibility of your works at such events, so continue pushing that online!

Hope this helps! Please do let us know your experiences as you try different events. If anyone has other thoughts and suggestions, please do share!


Yaaay happy Labour Day! Just a quick note that we have a shiny spanking new facelift courtesy of orangisque~! All the navigation is at the top now if you want to access Toasted Posts, Resources, etc. but otherwise we’re still the same old aatoast, only better looking :3

Of course, if you mainly see us from your dashboard, you just get to see our bold new toasty yellow icon. Whoohoo!


prototypix asked:

Hello, I don't know if you've been asked this before, but I'm interested in buying a table hopefully next year for Anime North. For the moment, I don't have anything that's worthy of being sold as a print. Do you have any tips / a recommended procedure for someone to go about this? Thanks!

Hi prototypix! This took a while to put together, because we went off on a little (okay, a big) philosophical tangent. Your question is a bit vague/general, so this answer is taking a broader approach.

You know, you’re in a pretty exciting situation. The fact is, the world is your oyster because you’re basically starting from a blank slate!

The short answer:
Research, plan, and draw.

When you say something like “For the moment, I don’t have anything that’s worthy of being sold as a print” that’s a qualitative (subjective) statement - all I can say to that is, keep drawing/making your art till you have things that you would be comfortable making into a print. Look at your work objectively, get feedback from others (bearing in mind that not all feedback may be relevant for your goals/situation), etc. And remember - the more time you spend doing something, the more you are honing that skill. Even if you aren’t 100% happy with what you’re turning out at the moment, it means 1. you have enough skill that you can tell something can be improved and 2. you’re working towards an even more improved state. So keep at it!

The long (and even more philosophical) answer:
But there’s a lot more to your question, I think, than that. There’s a lot of great info about getting started with artist alleys (including tumblrs besides this one!), and I’ll touch on a bit of that, but I always want to cover some thought about attitude and mental approach/frame of mind.

I think many artists kind of fall into artist alley a bit like this: They go to a con, or several, and think, “Wow, look at all the artists drawing and selling cool things at artist alley! Looks like fun!” Then they realize, “Hey, I’m an artist! I like cool things! I could do that!” They might convince a friend to join them, sign up for a local event, think, “Oh crap! I don’t have anything to sell!! WHAT DID I GET MYSELF INTO” then fall screaming and crying into the next few months (or weeks) figuring out how to get ready (usually lots of asking around and internet research), drawing and making stuff, get ridiculously stressed out, go to the event feeling wholly unprepared, and more often than leave the event ridiculously addicted to doing artist alleys for the next while (or next few years). And the cycle starts anew!

In other words, many people get started with lots of enthusiasm and excitement and not necessarily much vision for the future. And that’s not a bad thing in and of itself. That’s certainly how I got started! And sometimes you just need to start doing something to start going somewhere.

(On that tangent of getting started, I posted a rant a short while ago here: http://aatoast.tumblr.com/post/94950934510/maiji-ok-to-whomever-submitted-this-i-dont
howtobeaconartist, another great AA info tumblr, reblogged it inviting people to share their first time AA experiences, and their stories make for interesting reading to get you into a headspace of realistic expectations. We get so caught up in what we are doing and whether we are doing it “right” or not that it’s always good to get some perspective and realize almost everyone is in the same boat!)

It’s usually not till after a few years of doing artist alley events that people start to think more long term or more practically/proactively about sustainability and where/how their artist alley activity fits into some sort of vision for their creative path or personal creative goals. And to be perfectly honest, for some people, maybe you don’t necessarily want or need to go beyond drawing and selling cool things and having fun at artist alley. It’s rare and difficult to make this your whole life, and it’s not everyone who does art for a living. But since you’re asking if we have any recommended procedures, I want to talk a bit about thinking in that vein.
Similar to our post about preparing to make an artbook http://aatoast.tumblr.com/post/89708185124/hello-i-was-wondering-if-you-have-any-advice-guide-on, you always want to start with research and planning: inventory where you are, and then outline where you want to go. Then you can figure out how to get there!

I would suggest starting with this question:
==========
WHAT ARE MY EXPECTATIONS AND GOALS?
==========
There are two main parts to this.

First, why do you want to do artist alley?
What do you want to get out of it? Is it to try it for the experience? To challenge yourself/take yourself out of a comfort zone? To share your work or create a bigger audience for your work? Build your skills? Make money? Meet other like-minded people?

Usually it’s a mix of a number of different factors! And your reasons for doing it can change over time as your interests and priorities shift. But it’s always good to think a bit about it to understand yourself, where you are now, and what you value the most!

Second, what would you like to be known for?
What are you passionate about? What do you like or want to draw / make? What are your own creative / artistic goals? What would you like others to see/recognize about the work that you do? What do you want to work towards?

The purpose of this question is to identify where it would make the most sense for you to concentrate your efforts, and how to manage your own expectations and evaluate what a successful, worthwhile artist alley experience is for you. If your goals are to have fun and draw fanart, that indicates certain things to focus on. If you want to create your own things and establish your own particular type of work, that creates a different sort of path, one that involves a more long-term approach and possibly more tempering of your expectations.
Here’s a personal example. Artist alley is a fun pastime for me. I love sharing my work and things I love and getting to talk in person about them. I have no interest in making my art a full time job. I love meeting other creative people and being inspired by them. I’ve never really been actively involved in any super popular fandoms, but I’m passionate about some small, older, obscure fandoms.

What does all this mean? For me, a successful artist alley is one where I meet people who like my work, expose more people to my work, have fun with my friends, get to buy awesome things from other artists and chat with other artists. When I make things, I care less about how profitable it may be, and more about whether I want it to exist/I want to make it. Of course I still care about trying to cover my costs and not lose a ton of money, but I’m less focused on, for instance, figuring out what series or products will be most popular event to event. If I don’t break even but still achieved my other goals, then I can still consider that a successful event by thinking of it as paying a fee to go and have an experience.

If your situation and your goals are different, your approach will be different. For example: if you are prioritizing short-term money making, then trying to figure out what is popular/will sell easily and maximizing profit will be more important to you. If your goal is to make art your living and to be recognized for a distinct visual style, then your focus will not only be on developing that distinct style and working beyond fanart, but also on building a business and an audience for the long run.

Now that you’ve set a vision for what you want to get out of this, you can really start to plan and research with those goals in mind!

Take a look around artist alley information resources (our tumblr, other tumblrs we’ve reblogged/linked, artist alley forums and posts). Figure out a direction, and then start working towards that direction in developing your art/craft, making the things you want to sell, creating your display, and also gathering what you need to make sure you’re ready when application time comes around.

I’ll be a bit more brief in this section (or try to be anyways), because a lot of these things are covered by great artist alley guides.
A few things to think about:

The event
You’ve already identified Anime North as a target event. Great! Now you need to do your homework and make sure you know what’s involved in applying for the event. Read up on requirements. Know what’s permitted and not permitted, and what you need to prep in advance. Have back up plans if you need them. For example, Anime North Comic Market is now a lottery system. If you don’t get a table, what do you plan on doing? Just wait for next year, or try other areas of the event or other events? Do you have friends who may also be interested and could table share?

One thing I often suggest for people starting out is to try smaller local events over bigger events. They may be less profitable (smaller crowds, slower), but they are almost always cheaper, closer to home, less intimidating, and great for trying things for the first time. We talk a bit about that in our FanExpo vs Anime North post: http://aatoast.tumblr.com/post/93341701579/hey-so-im-a-total-beginner-at-conventions-and-fanexpo
Not to say that not making any sales at a small event won’t leave you feeling discouraged, but making nothing at an event that cost you $20 versus one that cost you $300 is a big difference in tempering your expectations and the extremeness of a positive or negative reaction over the long term of your artist alley “career”.

The other benefit of smaller events is that you have more time to interact with other artists, which is a powerful way to make new friends and build a great support network as you do more and more events. I’ve often seen many experienced artists comment positively on the vibe of smaller events and how they enjoy getting to chat with people.
(The above actually generated a bit of a discussion for us on small versus big events and the psychology of event scope and event interactions - I think it’s worth sharing so we may put out a separate post sometime with some thoughts on that!)
The goods / The display
As mentioned before, when you start out, you have no old inventory/products or legacy things that might be holding you down in terms of what you want to make or what you want to display.

What is realistic for you to create based on your resources (time, cost, knowledge, experience)? What kind of quality are you looking for in your products? Are there people you can turn to for support/advice/assistance? And of course, if you’re doing something for the first time, it’s always good to have a trial run before doing it for real! Make sure you incorporate that into your plans/schedules!
Hope this helps. And all that said and done about planning - sometimes the best plans go awry, and sometimes you just won’t think of something till you get there and everything is happening for real. Take it in stride and learn from it! We’re all figuring it out as we go along :)
Hope this answer was at least a little what you were looking for, and I hope this is only the beginning of some great artist alley experiences for you! :D
As always, if anyone has more food for thought/things to add, we’d love to hear from you!

Details for the 2014 Doujinka Festival (taking place as part of the Anime North Halloween event) are now up!

Friday, October 24, 2014
7PM (doors open at 6:30PM)
General Admission: $10
AN2014 and JCCC members: $8
Entrance fee available only at the door

Japanese Canadian Cultural Centre, 6 Garamond Court, Toronto, ON, M3C 1Z5

There are a limited number of Doujinka Tables for artists and Vendors Spaces for Vendors and Crafters available.

The Doujinshi Festival space costs $40* with 1 (one) 6 x 2 1⁄2 ‘ table, 2 (two) chairs and 2 (two) exhibitor’s passes.

The Vendor’s Space costs $90* with 2 (two) 6 x 2 1⁄2 ‘ tables with 4 (four) chairs and 4 (four) exhibitor’s passes.**

* *plus applicable online service charges if you choose to pay online.
** note the website cuts off after the second 4, but I think it is supposed to say passes.

If you are interested, please read the FAQ and check out complete contact details in the link.




Calling all fashion artisans - Toronto Indie Arts Market is now accepting applications to take part in our October 18th Fall Fashion Festival at the Gladstone Hotel.
We have approximately 50 spots for local, independent artisans of clothing, jewellery, accessories and cosmetics/bodycare products. We are looking for cool and unique wares for men, women and children. For clothing vendors, preference will be given to designers who are able to bring the widest range of sizes (petites to plus sizes) to sell off the rack (not custom ordered).
Sorry - no vintage (except for upcycled items), no resellers, no importers and no mass-manufactured goods. All items sold must be created locally and be handmade by the person running the table.
Table prices range from $20 (2ft table) - $60 (6ft table). Garment vendor spots that will accommodate racks are $60. Payment is via PayPal only.
This event will have a $5 admission at the door with 40% of proceeds going to Windfall Basics, an organization that supplies basic clothing necessities to those in need.
To submit an application, please visit www.torontoindieartsmarket.com - full FAQ and schedule are posted under the Info For Vendors section.

Also, if you&#8217;re interested in checking out TIAM in advance to do research before signing up in the future, there is a Summer Sunset market taking place this Thursday August 21. The Summer evening markets are slightly different from the &#8220;standard&#8221; TIAMs (they are free instead of paid admission, for instance, and smaller), but it takes place in the same location and offers a similar vibe. Also, all guests attending that event will get a 2-for-1 admission flyer to the October 18th Fall Fashion Festival!
Full details on the TIAM website! http://www.torontoindieartsmarket.com/

Calling all fashion artisans - Toronto Indie Arts Market is now accepting applications to take part in our October 18th Fall Fashion Festival at the Gladstone Hotel.

We have approximately 50 spots for local, independent artisans of clothing, jewellery, accessories and cosmetics/bodycare products. We are looking for cool and unique wares for men, women and children. For clothing vendors, preference will be given to designers who are able to bring the widest range of sizes (petites to plus sizes) to sell off the rack (not custom ordered).

Sorry - no vintage (except for upcycled items), no resellers, no importers and no mass-manufactured goods. All items sold must be created locally and be handmade by the person running the table.

Table prices range from $20 (2ft table) - $60 (6ft table). Garment vendor spots that will accommodate racks are $60. Payment is via PayPal only.

This event will have a $5 admission at the door with 40% of proceeds going to Windfall Basics, an organization that supplies basic clothing necessities to those in need.

To submit an application, please visit www.torontoindieartsmarket.com - full FAQ and schedule are posted under the Info For Vendors section.

Also, if you’re interested in checking out TIAM in advance to do research before signing up in the future, there is a Summer Sunset market taking place this Thursday August 21. The Summer evening markets are slightly different from the “standard” TIAMs (they are free instead of paid admission, for instance, and smaller), but it takes place in the same location and offers a similar vibe. Also, all guests attending that event will get a 2-for-1 admission flyer to the October 18th Fall Fashion Festival!

Full details on the TIAM website! http://www.torontoindieartsmarket.com/